Recruiting help to save you money.
If your student-athlete needs to get evaluated by college coaches for scholarship consideration and to sign with a college program, our GUARANTEED College Matching Program is right for you! 
REMINDER:  College football rule change.
                       New Early Signing Period is December 20-22, 2017

HOW TO GET A RECRUITED FOR FOOTBALL

Are you asking yourself any of the the following football recruiting questions?

  • I’m a freshman, is it too early for me to think about college football recruiting?
  • I’m a senior, is it too late for me to get a football scholarship?
  • What do I need to do to get a scholarship to play college football?
  • How does football recruiting for college work?
  • When do football scouts evaluate players like me?
  • How do college recruiting websites work?
  • Does football have full scholarships?

If you’re asking yourself any of these questions or have any thought of playing college football, one of the most important things you can do to help yourself is to evaluate where you are personally in the college recruiting timeline. Your age and experience dictate your action:

  • Are you a freshman, sophomore, junior, senior or transfer candidate?
  • What time of year is it?
  • What level have you played on?
  • How much travel experience do you have?
  • Do you have a professionally-edited highlight video or edited full-game videos?
  • Have you been recruited yet?
    • If yes, to what degree?
    • If no, what’s your plan to get recruited?

TOP 5 RECRUITING THINGS TO DO


1. Develop a recruiting plan and get evaluated by a third party.

What are you currently doing to get evaluated for college softball scholarships?  What results has your current plan produced?  If you are not currently being contacted by college coaches at least once per week, then you are not being actively recruited.   

You need to be evaluated by as many college coaches nationwide as possible to maximize your scholarship opportunities and securing a college roster spot immediately!   Utilizing a third party like AASR is an important first step in the recruiting process.  Attending camps and showcases also increases your evaluation exposure to coaches.


 2. Create your FREE MyScoutingReport NOW! 

Online profiles are the fastest way for college coaches to evaluate a prospects academic qualifications, athletic attributes, highlight/game videos, review game schedules, news articles and how to contact you.   

 

3. Take charge of your game, highlight, or skills video!

DO NOT wait around for someone else to burn game DVD's or edit a highlight video for you!  Take control of your recruiting process by taking action each day until your video(s) are complete and accessible by college coaches.   


4. Be realistic about your projected college level. 

Too many college prospects get focused on playing ONLY for major NCAA Division I programs, that they miss out on opportunities to play at a lower level and possibly on a scholarship.    


5. DO NOT LIMIT YOURSELF! 

Time and again college prospects limit themselves to only wanting to play at a certain level, local area, in-state, U.S. region or certain conferences.  The fact of the matter is that college coaches get to choose which players they want on their roster and which to offer scholarships to.  It's not the players or parents that choose...once again, it's the college coaches.  By limiting yourself to only certain areas for recruitment, you can bet your life that there will be some college coach around the country that could use a student-athlete like you!   

   FOOTBALL RECRUITING FAQ 


1. When does the football recruiting process begin?

The first day a student-athlete attends a high school class, they are considered a college prospect by the NCAA.  In particular, football recruiting starts early because competition for scholarships is extremely high. Most NCAA I scholarship offers are made during the spring semester of a prospects junior year.  


2.  How do I get discovered?

College coaches can recruit prospects on third-party evaluations from a trusted neutral source like AASR.  If you don't have a discoverable or marketable profile for college coaches to evaluate, then they won't know about you. 

Remember, if college coaches are not calling you at least once per week, then  YOU ARE NOT BEING ACTIVELY RECRUITED!  Whatever you have been doing to get evaluated by college coaches has not been working, then it's time to change your strategy!


3. How do coaches evaluate prospects?

The fastest way to get a college coaches attention is with a highlight video.  Interested coaches will request game video to evaluate.  Online videos can speed up the recruiting process for both you and college coaches.

 

4. What are my chances of getting a division one football scholarship?

The chances of receiving an NCAA I football scholarships are very remote. There are only about 125 NCAA I programs, and each has 85 scholarships. That means there are roughly 10,000 scholarship NCAA I football players out there.  With roughly 1.5 million high school football players, the odds are less than 1%.

5.  Will attending college football camps help me get a football scholarship?

If used properly camps can be a critical tool for prospects. Some camps will have several hundred student-athletes in attendance. If you just walk in the door “cold” as an unknown, odds are you won’t receive a lot of recruiting benefit from that camp. You will certainly benefit from good coaching and get better - but coaches are not going to be able to focus in on you if they don’t know that you’re coming. The key to maximizing your recruitability at camps is to make sure coaches know who you are before you get there. Ideally, the coaches will have seen you play on viewership-enabled video before you attend the camp. If you don’t have any varsity video prior to the camp, be sure they have access to a profile and some kind of workout, 7-on-7, 1-on-1, or skill video prior to the camp.

         WHAT ARE COLLEGE FOOTBALL COACHES LOOKING FOR?


Football Positional Guidelines

Ever found yourself asking the following questions about college football recruiting?

  • How can I get an athletic scholarship to play football at my favorite school?
  • What do the coaches at my favorite school look for during the football recruiting process?
  • How do coaches at my favorite college program conduct their football scouting?
    • Do they go out to high school football games?
    • Do they use recruiting services?
    • Do they watch video?
  • If my favorite college football program doesn’t recruit me, where can I get a scholarship?
  • I want to play D1 ball in a major conference, but how do I know if that’s right for me?

 BCS Defensive Back

  • Height: 6'0"
  • Weight: 185 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.5
  • Bench: 270 lbs.
  • Squat: 405 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Both an elite athlete and a tough football player. Fearless on the field. Great recovery speed. Naturally flips hips and gets in and out of breaks. Doesn’t take false steps. Great instincts. Flies up the alley to support in the run game and against screens. Can play man or zone. Quick feet. Elite free safety prospects display great range to cover sideline to sideline. Tremendous ball skills. Great leaping ability with the knack to high point the ball or take it away from taller receivers. Typically 1st or 2nd Team All-State with recognition from the national recruiting media as an underclassmen. Typically Multi-Year All Area/All District and All Conference performer at minimum.


Non-BCS D1 and/or High FCS Defensive Back

  • Height: 6'0"
  • Weight: 180 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.6
  • Bench: 250 lbs.
  • Squat: 380 lbs.

Coach Keys:

May have not shown the production of an elite BCS caliber recruit, but coaches at this level will still scholarship athletic high school defensive backs if they believe they can coach them up into productive college players. Prospects will show they’re one of the better athletes on the field. Flashes ability to flip hips and gets in and out of breaks. Rarely takes false steps. Good instincts. Flashes ability to come up in the alley to support in the run game and against screens. Good feet. Top free safety prospects need range to play center field or at least deep half. Good ball skills. Good leaping ability. Flashes ability to high point the ball or take it away from taller receivers. Typically All-State, All Area/District with some recognition from recruiting media. All Conference performer at minimum.


Low FCS/High D2/High NAIA Defensive Back

  • Height: 5'10"
  • Weight: 175 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.65
  • Bench: 250 lbs.
  • Squat: 380 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Good athlete - tough competitor. Willing in run support. Solid change of direction skills. Solid leaping ability. Flashes ability to get the ball in traffic. Typically All Area or All Conference.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Defensive Back

  • Height: 5'9"
  • Weight: 160 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.7
  • Bench: 240 lbs.
  • Squat: 295 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Solid athlete - tough competitor. Has to be a committed, rugged football player more than an elite athlete. Willing to mix it up in run support. Decent change of direction skills. Decent leaping ability. High degree of variance in accolades from All Conference to a one year varsity starter.

BCS Defensive Line

  • Height: 6'4"
  • Weight: 260 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.8
  • Bench: 315 lbs.
  • Squat: 450 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Can overpower and/or out-quick HS offensive linemen any time he wants. Elite quick-twitch get off skills. Dominates the line of scrimmage and jumps off the screen during evaluation. Commands double-teams and still wins. Shows great technique and has developed some pass rush moves. Great footwork and leverage in the run game. Stuns and sheds blockers and can maintain a gap. Can penetrate at will. Typically Multiple-Time All-State Honoree with recognition from national recruiting media. Minimum Multi-year All Area/All District, All Conference Selection.


Non BCS D1 and/or High FCS Defensive Line

  • Height: 6'3"
  • Weight: 240 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.9
  • Bench: 305 lbs.
  • Squat: 415 lbs.

Coach Keys:

May have not shown the production of an elite BCS caliber recruit, but college coaches at this level will still scholarship athletic or high school defensive linemen with tremendous size as they believe they can coach them up into productive college players. A prospect of this caliber demonstrates consistent ability to overpower or out-quick HS offensive linemen. Displays quick-twitch get off skills. Dominates the line of scrimmage. Commands double-teams and flashes the ability to defeat those combinations. Shows good technique and has developed at least one pass rush move. Good footwork and leverage in the run game. Stuns and sheds blockers and will maintain a gap. Can penetrate gaps. Some recognition from national recruiting media. Typically All Area/All District, All Conference Selection.


Low FCS/High D2/High NAIA Defensive Line

  • Height: 6'2"
  • Weight: 230 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.8
  • Bench: 305 lbs.
  • Squat: 405 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Flashes ability to overpower or out-quick HS offensive linemen. Flashes quick-twitch get off skills. Controls the line of scrimmage. Good footwork and leverage in the run game. Can get off blocks. Flashes ability to penetrate gaps. Typically All Area or All Conference Selection.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Defensive Line

  • Height: 6'1"
  • Weight: 220 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.9
  • Bench: 295 lbs.
  • Squat: 395 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Displays ability to beat HS offensive linemen. Solid get-off. Flashes ability to win at the line of scrimmage. Solid footwork and leverage in the run game. Can get off blocks. Typically All Conference Selection but minimum 1 year varsity starter. 

BCS Linebacker

  • Height: 6'2"
  • Weight: 220 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.6
  • Bench: 315 lbs.
  • Squat: 445 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Shows the ability to take over a game defensively. Active and causes havoc all around the field. Knocks blockers and ball-carriers backward and/or off their feet. Instinctive and plays downhill in the run game. Strong enough to play on LOS in HS if necessary but athletic enough to play in coverage. Explodes on contact, visibly changing the LOS or driving ballcarriers backward. Displays loose hips and great knee bend, plays under his pads. Can match up with anyone and run them down. Understands pursuit angles and can close time and space in an instant. Multiple year All-State selection with some recognition by national recruiting media on the high end. All Area/District and Multi-Year All Conference at a minimum. Defensive Captains with signal-calling experience are highly desirable for inside linebackers.


Non-BCS and/or High FCS Linebacker

  • Height: 6'1"
  • Weight: 210 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.65
  • Bench: 300 lbs.
  • Squat: 435 lbs.

Coach Keys:

May have not shown the production of an elite BCS caliber recruit, but coaches at this level will still scholarship athletic high school linebackers as they believe they can coach them up into productive college players. Active player that’s constantly around the ball. Knocks blockers and ball-carriers backward on impact. Plays downhill in the run game. Strong on contact, can change the LOS.. Good knee bend. Can match up with most offensive players and run them down. Understands pursuit angles and can close time and space. Multiple year All-State selection with some recognition by national recruiting media. All Area/District and Multi-Year All Conference. Defensive Captains with signal-calling experience are highly desirable for inside linebackers.


Low FCS/High D2/High NAIA Linebacker

  • Height: 6'0"
  • Weight: 200 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.7
  • Bench: 295 lbs.
  • Squat: 405 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Active player shows good movement. Stands blockers up and knocks ball-carriers backward on contact. Instinctive in the run game. Strong on contact. Solid knee bend. Pursues well. All Area/District and Multi-Year All Conference. Defensive Captains with signal-calling experience are highly desirable for inside linebackers.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Linebacker

  • Height: 5'10"
  • Weight: 190 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.75
  • Bench: 275 lbs.
  • Squat: 395 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Active player flashes decent movement. Flashes ability to stand blockers up and also to knock ball-carriers backward on contact. Flashes solid instincts in the run game. Flashes decent knee bend. Shows decent pursuit skills. Typically All Conference or minimum 1 Year Varsity Starter. Defensive Captains with signal-calling experience are highly desirable for inside linebackers. 

BCS Offensive Line

  • Height: 6'5"
  • Weight: 280 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 5.0
  • Bench: 320 lbs.
  • Squat: 450 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Dominates the LOS, and puts HS players on their backs. Can move the line of scrimmage by 5 yards at will. Gets to the second level with ease and wins in space. Displays great balance, rarely on the ground. Plays with excellent pad level by demonstrating great knee bend. Plays with a great natural wide base. Shows the ability to naturally pass set, slide and mirror with ease. Can maintain balance running and can hit moving targets downfield. All-State, All Area/District type player with national attention from recruiting media. Typically a multiple-time All Conference selection.


Non-BCS and/or High FCS Offensive Line

  • Height: 6'3"
  • Weight: 270 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 5.2
  • Bench: 305 lbs.
  • Squat: 425 lbs.

Coach Keys:

May have not shown the consistent dominance of an elite BCS caliber recruit, but coaches at this level will still scholarship athletic high school offensive linemen as they believe they can develop them with a redshirt year and a good strength and conditioning program. Flashes the ability to dominate the LOS and knock HS players on the ground. Can get to the second level regularly. Flashes the ability to move the line of scrimmage. Flashes the ability to finish blocks. Displays good balance, rarely on the ground. Plays with great pad level by demonstrating good knee bend. Plays with a good natural wide base. Shows the ability to pass set, slide and mirror. Can hit moving targets downfield. All Area/District type player. Typically a multiple-time All Conference selection.


Low FCS/High D2/High NAIA Offensive Line

  • Height: 6'2"
  • Weight: 260 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 5.3
  • Bench: 300 lbs.
  • Squat: 410 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Flashes the ability to dominate the LOS and knock HS players on the ground. Can get to the second level regularly. Flashes the ability to move the line of scrimmage. Displays good balance, rarely on the ground. Plays with great pad level by demonstrating good knee bend. Plays with a good natural wide base. Shows the ability to pass set, slide and mirror. Can hit moving targets downfield. All Area/District type player. Typically a multiple-time All Conference selection.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Offensive Line

  • Height: 6'1"
  • Weight: 240 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 5.4
  • Bench: 295 lbs.
  • Squat: 405 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Flashes the ability to move the LOS. Can get to the second level. Displays good balance, stays off the ground. Plays with solid pad level by demonstrating decent knee bend. Can pass set and move his feet. Hustles to the ball. Typically All Conference selection or a Varsity Starter.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Offensive Line

  • Height: 6'1"
  • Weight: 240 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 5.4
  • Bench: 295 lbs.
  • Squat: 405 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Flashes the ability to move the LOS. Can get to the second level. Displays good balance, stays off the ground. Plays with solid pad level by demonstrating decent knee bend. Can pass set and move his feet. Hustles to the ball. Typically All Conference selection or a Varsity Starter.

 

BCS Quarterback

  • Height: 6'4"
  • Weight: 220 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.5
  • Bench: 260 lbs.
  • Squat: 425 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Must be polished. Pro-Style QBs or Passing Spread QBs should be able to throw the Deep Out, Comeback, Dig, and Seam Route with no loft. Should be able to throw ball through goalpost from opposite 40 yard line. Proficient ability to throw receivers open and execute the back shoulder throw. Dual-Threat QBs may be raw as passers but should show as the best pure athlete on the field in every game and possess elite size/speed combinations. Has to have demonstrated QB ability multiple years at an All-State level or High All Area/District at a minimum. Should have recognition from national recruiting media and log performances on the camp and combine circuit.


Non-BCS and/or High FCS Quarterback

  • Height: 6'2"
  • Weight: 200 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.6
  • Bench: 250 lbs.
  • Squat: 385 lbs.

Coach Keys:

May have not shown the production or raw tools of an elite BCS caliber recruit, but coaches at this level will still scholarship high school QBs with outstanding individual attributes such as speed, arm strength, leadership, etc., even if they don’t have a polished and well-rounded game coming out of high school. These are QBs that are evaluated much like Pro Baseball Scouts evaluate prospects by the 5 Tool Scale. They’ll have at least one, maybe 2 very special attributes while the others must be developed with a redshirt year. Pro Style and Spread QBs must flash the ability to throw the Deep Out, Comeback, Dig, and Seam Route with minimal loft. Should be able to throw ball through goalpost from opposite 45 yard line. Flashes the ability ability to throw receivers open and execute the back shoulder throw. Dual-Threat QBs may be raw as passers but should show as one of the better pure athlete on the field in every game and possess excellent size/speed combinations. Has to have demonstrated QB ability multiple years at an All Area level or All-Conference level at minimum.


Low FCS/High D2/High NAIA Quarterback

  • Height: 6'0"
  • Weight: 200 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.7
  • Bench: 225 lbs.
  • Squat: 345 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Pro-Style and Spread QBs must be able to throw the Deep Out, Comeback, Dig, and Seam Route with slight loft. Should be able to throw ball through goalpost from 50 yard line. Proficient ability to throw receivers open and execute the back shoulder throw. Dual-Threat QBs may be raw as passers but should show well as a pure athlete on the field in every game and possess above average size/speed combinations. Has to have demonstrated QB ability at an All-Conference level at minimum.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Quarterback

  • Height: 5'10"
  • Weight: 180 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.8
  • Bench: 205 lbs.
  • Squat: 315 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Pro-Style and Spread QBs must be able to throw the Deep Out, Comeback, Dig, and Seam Route with some loft. Should be able to throw ball through goalpost from near 45 yard line. Proficient ability to throw receivers open and execute the back shoulder throw. Dual-Threat QBs may be raw as passers but should possess an above average size/speed combination. Has to have demonstrated QB ability at least 1 year at a varsity level.

BCS Running Back

  • Height: 6'0"
  • Weight: 210 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.4
  • Bench: 280 lbs.
  • Squat: 390 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Runs with both power, speed and balance and can pull away from second level defenders. Must have exceptional lower and upper body strength. Has to have demonstrated RB ability multiple years at an All-State or All District Level. Recognition from national recruiting media. Multiple Year All Conference Selection at minimum.


Non-BCS or High FCS Running Back

  • Height: 5'11"
  • Weight: 195 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.5
  • Bench: 270 lbs.
  • Squat: 375 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Tough and fast runner with ability to break multiple tackles and most second level defenders. Must have quickness to elude defenders and run downhill quickly. Has to have demonstrated RB ability multiple years at an All-Conference level.


Low FCS/High D2/High NAIA Running Back

  • Height: 5'10"
  • Weight: 175 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.6
  • Bench: 265 lbs.
  • Squat: 350 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Durable runner with power and speed. Good acceleration, balance and effort. Shows quickness and instincts. Has to have demonstrated RB ability at an All-Conference level.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Running Back

  • Height: 5'9"
  • Weight: 160 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.7
  • Bench: 260 lbs.
  • Squat: 340 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Must be a tough and instinctive runner with adequate speed. Has to have demonstrated RB ability at least 1 year at a varsity level.

BCS Tight End

  • Height: 6'4"
  • Weight: 230 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.7
  • Bench: 300 lbs.
  • Squat: 440 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Have a great combination of size & speed, and must change the LOS at the point of attack. Soft hands. Needs to be able to stretch the field vertically. Demonstrates explosive physicality. Can find the open window in zone and separates from man coverage. Shows the ability to break tackles and gain yards after contact. He is a multiple year All-State player and in some cases an All-American.


Non-BCS or High FCS Tight End

  • Height: 6'3"
  • Weight: 220 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.8
  • Bench: 285 lbs.
  • Squat: 420 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Has a combination of size and speed, and must change the LOS at the point of attack. Soft hands. Needs to be able to stretch the field vertically. Can find the open window in zone and separates from man coverage. Threat after the catch. He is a multiple year All-Conference player.


Low FCS/High D2/High NAIA Tight End

  • Height: 6'2"
  • Weight: 215 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.85
  • Bench: 275 lbs.
  • Squat: 415 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Has a combination of size and speed, and must change the LOS at the point of attack. Soft hands. Needs to be able to stretch the field vertically. Can find the open window in zone and separates from man coverage. Threat after the catch. He is a multiple year All-Conference player.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Tight End

  • Height: 6'1"
  • Weight: 205 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.9
  • Bench: 270 lbs.
  • Squat: 405 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Has a combination of size and speed, and must change the LOS at the point of attack. Soft hands. Can be one dimensional as a blocker or receiver. Needs to be able to stretch the field vertically. Can find the open window in zone or separate from man coverage. Threat after the catch. Varsity starter. 

BCS Wide Receiver

  • Height: 6'2"
  • Weight: 190 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.5
  • Bench: 235 lbs.
  • Squat: 315 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Must be a constant threat anytime he is on the field. Must have an instant release off of the LOS with low pad level and little wasted movement, a burst into the route, one step cuts, impeccable catching ability, and the ability to separate himself from defenders with rare top end speed and elusiveness. He must be able to catch a jump ball as easy as a post, shallow, slant, or hitch. He must be comfortable running all routes, possesses rare ball skills, have a great combination of size & speed, and a willingness to block. He is a multiple year All-State player and in some cases an All-American.


Non-BCS or High FCS Wide Receiver

  • Height: 6'0"
  • Weight: 175 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.6
  • Bench: 225 lbs.
  • Squat: 295 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Must have an instant release off of the LOS with low pad level, a burst into the route, one step cuts, outstanding catching ability, and the ability to separate himself from defenders with his speed. He must be able to catch a jump ball as easy as a mesh, slant, or hitch. He must be comfortable running all routes, posses very good ball skills, and a willingness to block. He has earned All-State and All-Conference honors.


Low FCS/High D2/High NAIA Wide Receiver

  • Height: 5'10"
  • Weight: 165 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.6
  • Bench: 205 lbs.
  • Squat: 275 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Must have a quick release off of the LOS, good vision and instincts, good hands, the quickness to make defenders miss. He is typically very athletic, quicker than fast or possesses the speed and is undersized for the position. He is willing to block and plays with a high motor. He has earned All-Conference Honors.


Low D2/NAIA/All D3 Wide Receiver

  • Height: 5'8"
  • Weight: 150 lbs.

Stats:

  • 40yd: 4.7
  • Bench: 200 lbs.
  • Squat: 265 lbs.

Coach Keys:

Must be able to release from the line quickly, sell the go route, make precise cuts in/out of breaks, catch the ball on a consistent basis, and is typically quicker than fast. He must have least 1 year of varsity football experience. 

FOOTBALL RECRUITING CALENDAR

Freshmen Year: Research and Exposure

  • Create a list of prospective schools (Each week research 2-3 schools)
  • Find camps or combines in your area
  • Attend the combines and keep track of your accomplishments during the camps
  • Start thinking about filming highlight tape 


Sophomore Year: Relationships. Film Footage.

  • Hone in on the schools you’re most interested in from your list  

 

Tips from the Expert:

  • DI and DII coaches can’t personally contact you 
  • DIII and NAIA coaches can contact you 
  • High level DI will make offers during summer of your sophomore year

 

Junior Year: 5-5-5 List. Highlights. Proactive Athleader.

  • Develop a 5-5-5 List: 5 programs that may be slightly above your reach, 5 programs that are a good fit, 5 back up schools
  • Follow-up with coaches with phone calls/email/letters and where you stand on their list of recruits
  • Attend combines, camps and one-day college-sponsored camps
  • Make highlight footage tape

 

Tip from the Expert:

If you haven’t heard from DI coaches, reach out to DII, DIII or NAIA programs

 

Senior Year: Committing to Success athletically and academically.

  • Follow-up with coaches and schedule official visits (only 5 total official visits to DI and DII schools)
  • Start your financial aid planning, register for FAFA (fafsa.ed.gov) as soon as January 1
  • Officially commit to a program (Signing Day is first Wednesday in Feb. through April 1)
  • Find out when you need to report to camp

 

Tips from Expert:

  • DI coaches can start calling on a weekly basis on Sept. 1st, most cases they have already made offers
  • DII, DIII, NAIA schools do most of recruiting and make offers in Spring of Senior Year
  • Junior College is an option for student-athletes who want to develop academically

COLLEGE FOOTBALL SCHOLARSHIPS


There are over 850 college football programs and more than 80,000 college football players.  Football has the most full scholarships than any other sport. 


                                     Programs        Scholarships

NCAA I-A FBS                  120               85 Full Scholarships; 0 Partial Scholarships

                                                              Coaches can offer up to 25 scholarships to new players each year.

NCAA I-AA FCS               125                63 Coaches offer full and partial scholarships.

NCAA II                            148                36 Coaches offer full and partial scholarships.

NCAA III                           237                0 NCAA III does not offer athletic scholarships.

NAIA                                  91                24 Coaches offer mostly partial scholarships.

NJCAA                            138                85 Full Scholarships for fully funded programs.

CAMPS & COMBINES


Attending a football camp can help you during the football recruiting process. Camp can benefit a high school athlete in several ways.

  • High school football players can improve their skills thanks to the instruction provided by college football coaches and players. This high level of teaching can be particularly helpful in the development of underclassmen.
  • Football camps offer some level of exposure to college football programs. But it’s important to realize that there’s not much of a chance of being “discovered” at a camp. Coaches already familiar with you may use a football camp to evaluate your talent. But if they don’t know who you are when you show up at camp, it’s likely they won’t know who you are when you leave.
  • Camp lets you see how you measure up to other talented football players, and it can give you a good idea of the skills you need to work on.
  • A college football camp can give you a feel for campus life. It’s a chance to check out a college’s dorms, athletic facilities and other aspects that may help you make a decision when it comes to choosing a school.

 

Choosing a Football Camp

Do your research when looking at football camps, and decide if you’re going to camp mainly for exposure or to work on your skills.

 

If you’re hoping to gain exposure you should go to a camp at a college that’s recruiting you. Remember that coaches don’t usually scout at camps, so go to a football camp where they already know who you are. Find out what coaches will be there, get in touch with them, and let them know you plan to attend.

 

If you’re going to camp strictly to improve your skills, find out if the coaching staff is experienced, has a history of winning, and is known for producing outstanding football players. Try to ask someone who’s been before about the level of athletic talent you should expect.


Football Combines: What they are and what they offer

A football combine lets high school football players show off their natural athletic ability with specific timed/measured events like the 40-yard dash and vertical jump. But, unlike a football camp, there is no instruction or teaching involved.

 

Reasons to attend a football combine.

  • ·The main reason to attend a football combine is to get measurable information about your skills. Verified statistics are important for your player profile, so getting timed in the 40-yard dash or shuttle run, or having your vertical jump measured at a combine can be beneficial. Verified combine results posted on a recruiting website from a trusted third party like AASR can be extremely valuable to college football coaches.
  • Combines can provide good, measurable information about your athletic ability, which can help you see how you measure up against other football recruits. Knowing what you need to improve on can help you when competing against other athletes for football scholarships.

 

When a football combine isn’t the right choice.

  • Don’t go to a combine if you think it will help you get “discovered”. College coaches don’t attend football combines, so there’s no chance that you’ll get exposure to college football programs by working out at one.
  • There’s no football instruction at a combine. So if you’re trying to improve your skills and learn more about the game of football attend a football camp instead. 

FILMING YOUR FOOTBALL VIDEO


It is critical to have a good recruiting video?

It’s not easy for high school football players to earn college football scholarships. Why? College coaches don’t have the time to travel and see over 1.5 million football recruits in person. That’s why a football highlight video is one of the most important parts of your online recruiting and football scouting resume. It takes just a few minutes for a well-made recruiting video to show football scouts and coaches what a high school football recruit can do on the football field. In order to have an effective football recruiting highlight video, you need to know specifically what football scouts and coaches are looking for and how they evaluate video.


Football coaches evaluate every position differently

All coaches have their own methodology for evaluating prospects. Remember, they are looking for the right players for their individual systems and schemes. Some coaches focus strictly on overall athleticism. They might not care what position you play or necessarily that you’re considered “undersized” - they want great athletes to mold into their system. Other coaches are trying to evaluate a player’s “frame” or “upside”. Could this player maintain great movement skills and add 30 pounds of muscle mass?

For example, you may be the best 170 pound running back in the country for example, but if that college coach runs the I-Formation and wants all of his running backs at 215 pounds or heavier, guys that can move the pile in the SEC, then that’s going to be first thing he looks for - whether you can move the pile in his conference. Every coach is looking for something different and that’s why it’s so important to be in front of as many coaches as possible. Also keep in mind these coaches constantly move from job to job and take their system with them, so from year-to-year when a school changes offensive or defensive coordinators or head coaches the types of players that they target may completely change.


Make sure the video is shot correctly

For example, a football highlight video should use in-game clips and show the entire field. You must be spot-shadowed correctly on every play! Position players should focus first on varsity footage if it’s available. College coaches don’t like to evaluate JV footage with the exception being select powerhouse programs in the top football states like Texas, Georgia and Florida. Punters, kickers and long snappers should also include skills videos not from game footage.

If you’re a young player or if you haven’t seen much varsity time you can include camp or combine footage such as 1-on-1 pass pro, workout footage (40, Pro Shuttle), or for skill players 7-on-7 just to give coaches a feel for your stature, athleticism, and skill level. Regardless of whether or not you currently have game or skill-based video, as long you’re getting the right viewership-enabled video footage out to college coaches you’re taking the first step toward earning a college football scholarship.


Filming and Editing

  • If you can’t get footage from your coach and someone else is filming - a tripod is highly recommended.
  • Be sure to film all of the players on the field, not just the featured player.
  • Give a wide enough angle so the coach can watch the entire play develop.
  • Shoot from an elevated location, with a clean line of sight.
  • The camera view should not be obstructed.
  • Do not zoom in and out.
  • Skills footage is only required for Kickers, Punters, and Long Snappers. Skills footage should be no more than 5 minutes in its raw form.
  • Footage must be on a lined field!
  • No music
  • No slo-mo
  • No special effects

A few initial tips:

  • Always put your best plays first! Your best plays show you at your most athletic, making your biggest hits or blocks. Remember college coaches spend hundreds of hours watching video, so if you don’t show well in the first 2 or 3 snaps, they may just move on.
  • Remember this is an evaluation tool for college coaches, not your personal music video for MTV. Don’t worry about the music, scrolling stats, or slo-mo, because the people that matter don’t care about that stuff. If you want to make a separate highlight video for entertainment purposes or with friends and family that’s fine, but that’s not the one college coaches want to see.
  • Focus your time and energy on proper play selection, sequencing and perfect spot shadowing. 

Defensive Backs

  • All Big Hits & Big Plays
  • Open Field Tackles
  • Pass Deflections and Interceptions
  • Flowing to the play & Stopping the Run
  • Cover Speed (In Coverage & Downfield), Recovery Speed (Chasing Down a Play)
  • Away from the ball skills (block defeat vs WR or tight man coverage)


Linebackers

  • Solid Technique Tackles & Big Hits
  • Pass Drops – Lateral & Vertical Footwork
  • Pass Deflections, Tackles for Loss
  • QB Pressures, Knockdowns, Sacks
  • Gap Filling on Run Plays – Block Defeat vs. OL & RB


Defensive Linemen

  • Solid Technique Tackles & Big Hits
  • Forced Fumbles & Batted Passes
  • QB Pressures, Knockdowns, Sacks
  • Tackles for Loss, Block Defeat vs. OL
  • DL Technique & Hand Movement – Swim Move, Spin Move, Bull Rush, Rip Move


Punters and Kickers

  • Skills footage and game footage
  • Punters:
    • Film from stands just like normal game film
    • Follow ball after it is punted
    • Every Solid Punt (Best Distance and/or Hang time)
    • All Punts Inside 20 and Beyond
    • All Tackles Made
    • Every Touchback KO
    • Successful Onside Kicks (no more than 3 on one given DVD)
    • All Successful Field Goals & 2-3 Successful PAT’s
  • Kickers:
    • Film on a tripod 5 yards behind kicker and 2 yards to the side.
    • Kickoffs should be from the 30 yard line.


Quarterbacks

  • Touchdown Passes
  • Rushing Touchdowns
  • Precision Passes – Hitting WR in stride
  • Out Passes
  • Deep Throws
  • Quick Series Throws
  • Scrambles
  • 3 & 5 Step Drops – Footwork
  • Playaction Ball-Handling
  • Sprint-Out
  • Boot Pass - throwing right and left
  • Option Style Running QB Highlights


Wide Receivers

  • Touchdown Catches
  • Great Fundamental Catches
    • Sideline Catch
    • In Traffic Catch
    • In Stride Catch
    • Tipped Ball Catch
    • Coming Back to the Ball Catch
  • Running with the Ball – Proper Technique, Breaking Away
  • Downfield Stalk Blocking, Crack Blocks
  • Yards After Catch


Running Backs

  • All Touchdowns (Rushing & Receiving)
  • Yards after Contact
  • Catching the ball out of the backfield
  • Breakaway Runs – Field Vision (Cutback Runs)
  • Big Blocks


Offensive Linemen

  • Good Balance - Staying on Your Feet
  • Low Pad Level
  • Pulling Blocks
  • Any Knock downs or Finishe
  • Solid Pass Sets & Punches


Long Snapper

  • Skills footage
  • Film from 5 yards in front of snapper and few yards to the side
  • Must have punter catching the snap
  • Also include side view to show technique

 SAMPLE FOOTBALL RECRUITING VIDEO